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drachegeblut:

my shoulders are the reason women aren’t allowed to wear tank tops at school

I think it’s those guns, it’s a gun free zone, right?

drachegeblut:

my shoulders are the reason women aren’t allowed to wear tank tops at school

I think it’s those guns, it’s a gun free zone, right?

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vital-dust:

"Ah yes, the haunting Torgo theme."

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TVC 15 anyone?

TVC 15 anyone?

(Source: smiller2323, via fyeahredeye)

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When I cared for .. the Oakland Raiders.

When I cared for .. the Oakland Raiders.

(Source: meditationsonmisery, via cobra-23)

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kateoplis:

Diamond Nights, Beth Moon

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Reblog … Owner of a Lonely Heart, Yes vs Max Graham

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Changes
David Bowie
Hunky Dory

Changes" is a song by David Bowie, originally released on the album Hunky Dory in December 1971 and as a single in January 1972. Despite missing the Top 40, “Changes” became one of Bowie’s best-known songs. The lyrics are often seen as a manifesto for his chameleonic personality, the frequent change of the world today, and frequent reinventions of his musical style throughout the 1970s.[1] This single is cited as David Bowie’s official North American debut, despite the fact that the song “The Man Who Sold the World" was released in North America two years prior.[2] This is the last song Bowie performed live on stage before his retirement from live performances at the end of 2006.[3]

-Wikipedia

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Fame (‘90 Remix)
David Bowie

With the Young Americans sessions mostly concluded by late 1974, the material was delayed while Bowie extricated himself from his contract with manager Tony Defries. During this time, he was staying in New York, where he met John Lennon. The pair jammedtogether, leading to a one-day session at Electric Lady Studios in January 1975. There, Bowie contacted several members of his tour band. First, a cover of The Beatles’ “Across the Universe”, a Lennon/McCartney song, was recorded. Then, a new song called “Fame”, inspired by a guitar riff by Carlos Alomar, and with the title from Lennon, was hurriedly developed and recorded by Bowie, Lennon, and Alomar. Both tracks were finally added to the Young Americans album. Lennon received co-writing credit due to the lyrics (bemoaning the nature of celebrity) having been inspired by conversations he had had with Bowie on the subject, and because Bowie acknowledged that Lennon singing “Fame!” over Alomar’s guitar riff was the catalyst for the song. Lennon’s vocals are also heard singing the repeated words “FAME, FAME, FAME” with his voice heard at fast, normal, and slow playback speeds, until Bowie’s vocal is heard singing the final lyrics of the song before the fade.[citation needed]

Bowie would later describe the song as “nasty, angry”, and fully admitted that the song was written “with a degree of malice” aimed at the Mainman management group with whom he had been working at the time. In 1990, Bowie reflected: “I’d had very upsetting management problems and a lot of that was built into the song. I’ve left that all that behind me, now… I think fame itself is not a rewarding thing. The most you can say is that it gets you a seat in restaurants.”[2]

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Ashes to Ashes 
David Bowie
Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps)

Ashes to Ashes" is a song by David Bowie, released in 1980. It made No. 1 in the UK and was the first cut from the Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) album, also a No. 1 hit. As well as its musical qualities, it is noted for its innovative video, directed by Bowie andDavid Mallet. The lyrics revisit Bowie’s Major Tom character from 1969’s “Space Oddity”, which he referenced once again in 1995 with “Hallo Spaceboy”. The song’s original title was “People Are Turning to Gold.”[1]

Interviewed in 1980, Bowie described the song as “a nursery rhyme. It’s very much a 1980s nursery rhyme. I think 1980s nursery rhymes will have a lot to do with the 1880s/1890s nursery rhymes which are all rather horrid and had little boys with their ears being cut off and stuff like that…”.[2] Years later, Bowie said that with “Ashes to Ashes” he was “wrapping up the seventies really for myself, and that seemed a good enough epitaph for it”.[3]

- Wikipedia

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Young Americans
David Bowie

The first studio result of Bowie’s mid-1970s obsession with soul music, “Young Americans” was a breakthrough hit for the artist in the United States (where the single was released in an edited 3:11 version). The sound, often later reflected on by Bowie as “plastic soul”, was matched by a cynical lyric, making references to McCarthyism, black repression via Rosa ParksRichard Nixon (who had resigned the U.S. Presidency two days before the recording session), as well as a near-direct lift from The Beatles’ “A Day in the Life" with the line "I heard the news today oh boy!" (John Lennon, who originally authored the line, appeared twice on the Young Americans album, providing background vocals and guitar on his own “Across The Universe" and "Fame”, for which he also received a co-writing credit.) In falsetto, Bowie asks the question: “Ain’t there one damn song that can make me… break down and cry?”. The backing vocal arrangement came at the suggestion of Luther Vandross.

The song was a massive breakthrough in the United States, where glam rock had never really become very popular outside the major cities. The song reached No. 28 in the Billboard charts, making it his second biggest success there up until that point. The song is ranked at number 481 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

- Wikipedia

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TVC 15
David Bowie
Sound + Vision II

TVC 15" is a song written and recorded by David Bowie in 1975 and released in 1976.

The track was inspired by an episode in which Iggy Pop, during a drug-fuelled period at Bowie’s LA home, hallucinated and believed the television set was swallowing his girlfriend. Bowie developed a story of a holographic television, TVC 15. In the song, the narrator’s girlfriend crawls into the television and afterwards, the narrator desires to crawl in himself to find her.

The song is considerably more upbeat than the rest of the album on which it was released, Station to Station. It was chosen as the second single from the album in the UK, where it reached No. 33. With Bowie unable to perform on the show, Top of the Popspromoted the single with a bizarre interpretation from resident dance troupe Ruby Flipper. The B-side, “We Are the Dead”, originally formed part of Bowie’s attempt to adapt Nineteen Eighty-Four, and had previously been released on the Diamond Dogs album.

In America, “Stay" was preferred as the second single from the album.

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"It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere." - Voltaire.

"It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere." - Voltaire.

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Ben Davidson and his helmet.

reblogged the past because the Raiders’ present sucks. 

(Source: bullit1987, via powpowkohl)

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The iconic Harley-Davidson chopper-style motorbike ridden by Peter Fonda in the 1969 classic Easy Rider was sold for $1.35 million (£840,000) at auction this weekend.


The Captain America bike, complete with authenticating documents including a letter from Fonda, was sold on Saturday (October 18) at entertainment industry auction house Profiles in History.


The red, white and blue stars-and-stripes panhead chopper was designed and built by two African-American bike builders, Cliff Vaughs and Ben Hardy, based on design suggestions from Fonda.


"After fierce bidding, we are so pleased that the buyer values this for the cultural icon that it is," said the seller, Mike Eisenberg.http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturenews/11173679/Easy-Rider-Harley-Davidson-sold-at-auction.html

The iconic Harley-Davidson chopper-style motorbike ridden by Peter Fonda in the 1969 classic Easy Rider was sold for $1.35 million (£840,000) at auction this weekend.

The Captain America bike, complete with authenticating documents including a letter from Fonda, was sold on Saturday (October 18) at entertainment industry auction house Profiles in History.

The red, white and blue stars-and-stripes panhead chopper was designed and built by two African-American bike builders, Cliff Vaughs and Ben Hardy, based on design suggestions from Fonda.

"After fierce bidding, we are so pleased that the buyer values this for the cultural icon that it is," said the seller, Mike Eisenberg.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturenews/11173679/Easy-Rider-Harley-Davidson-sold-at-auction.html

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"Greg Abbott won’t say whether he’d defend an interracial marriage ban—troubling but not surprising from someone who defends a “poll tax.”"

Wendy Davis, Gubernatorial Candidate for the State of Texas

Gee, didn’t Wendy Davis notice that Greg Abbot is married to a Mexican-American? Isn’t he in a interracial marriage? What does common sense tell you about Ms Davis?