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mudwerks:

vintagetoyarchive:

GILBERT: 1965 JAMES BOND 007 Action Figure

check out my snorkel…

mudwerks:

vintagetoyarchive:

GILBERT: 1965 JAMES BOND 007 Action Figure

check out my snorkel…

(via fishstickmonkey)

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Looks like Detroit, then and now.

Looks like Detroit, then and now.

(via happyacres)

Photoset

gringo60s:

The Beau Brummels 64/65

This band played in the 1965 movie “Village of the Giants” that was satirized in by MST3K in 1994.  I swear the lead singer was stoned out of his mind. 

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militarymom:

militarymom4ever:

militarymom4ever:

The Navajo Times has learned that another one of our warriors has passed on. Guy Clauschee, was one of the youngest Navajo Code Talkers to serve. According to his family, Mr. Clauschee passed on early this morning of natural causes. Funeral arrangements are still pending. Rest in peace, Mr. Guy Clauschee. Thank you for your service.

2 Code Talkers pass on in one week
By Bill DonovanSpecial to the Times
WINDOW ROCK, Sept. 13, 2014

Two Navajo Code Talkers died this past week, according to the tribal government and family members.
Guy Clauschee, 87, died early Thursday morning in Fort Defiance. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Monday at the Fort Defiance Presbyterian Church.
A Code Talker throughout most of World War II, Clauschee came back from the war and continued his education at the Ganado Mission. After graduating in 1950, he moved to Window Rock and started work with the Bureau of indian Affairs as a facilities management foreman. He retired after 40 years.
On Wednesday, tribal officials reported the death of another Navajo Code Talker, Robert Walley Sr., 93.
Walley served as a Code Talker from 1943 to 1945, during which he received a Purple Heart. He served in the 6th Marine Division and was a Marine Raider who fought in the Battle of Bougainville, Guam, Okinawa and the occupation of Emirau Island.
Both Walley and Clauschee received Congressional Silver Medals for their service as Navajo Code Talkers.
According to figures supplied by the Navajo Code Talkers Association, the number of Code Talkers has gone from more 400 to just 27.


God Bless

militarymom:

militarymom4ever:

militarymom4ever:

The Navajo Times has learned that another one of our warriors has passed on. 

Guy Clauschee, was one of the youngest Navajo Code Talkers to serve. According to his family, Mr. Clauschee passed on early this morning of natural causes. Funeral arrangements are still pending. 

Rest in peace, Mr. Guy Clauschee. Thank you for your service.

2 Code Talkers pass on in one week

By Bill Donovan
Special to the Times

WINDOW ROCK, Sept. 13, 2014

Two Navajo Code Talkers died this past week, according to the tribal government and family members.

Guy Clauschee, 87, died early Thursday morning in Fort Defiance. Services will be held at 10 a.m. on Monday at the Fort Defiance Presbyterian Church.

A Code Talker throughout most of World War II, Clauschee came back from the war and continued his education at the Ganado Mission. After graduating in 1950, he moved to Window Rock and started work with the Bureau of indian Affairs as a facilities management foreman. He retired after 40 years.

On Wednesday, tribal officials reported the death of another Navajo Code Talker, Robert Walley Sr., 93.

Walley served as a Code Talker from 1943 to 1945, during which he received a Purple Heart. He served in the 6th Marine Division and was a Marine Raider who fought in the Battle of Bougainville, Guam, Okinawa and the occupation of Emirau Island.

Both Walley and Clauschee received Congressional Silver Medals for their service as Navajo Code Talkers.

According to figures supplied by the Navajo Code Talkers Association, the number of Code Talkers has gone from more 400 to just 27.

image

God Bless

(Source: facebook.com, via cobra-23)

Photoset

mashable:

Photographer Reveals the Lonely Side of Superheroes

Photographer Benoit Lapray’s photo series, “The Quest for Absolute" focuses on the loneliness of famous superheroes, set in the beautiful, yet desolate landscape of the French Alps.

(via aussiecatdoll)

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Galileo spacecraft true-color image of Io. The dark spot just left of the center is the erupting volcanoPrometheus. The whitish plains on either side of it are coated with volcanically deposited sulfur dioxide frost, whereas the yellower regions contain a higher proportion of sulfur.
Io /ˈaɪ.oʊ/[6] is the innermost of the four Galilean moons of the planet Jupiter and, with a diameter of 3,642 kilometres (2,263 mi), the fourth-largest moon in the Solar System. It was named after the mythological character Io, a priestess of Herawho became one of Zeus's lovers.
With over 400 active volcanoes, Io is the most geologically active object in the Solar System.[7][8] This extreme geologic activity is the result of tidal heating from friction generated within Io’s interior as it is pulled between Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites—Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Several volcanoes produce plumes of sulfur and sulfur dioxide that climb as high as 500 km (300 mi) above the surface. Io’s surface is also dotted with more than 100 mountains that have been uplifted by extensive compression at the base of Io’s silicate crust. Some of these peaks are taller than Mount Everest.[9] Unlike most satellites in the outer Solar System, which are mostly composed of water ice, Io is primarily composed of silicate rock surrounding a molten iron or iron sulfide core. Most of Io’s surface is composed of extensive plains coated with sulfur and sulfur dioxide frost.
Io’s volcanism is responsible for many of its unique features. Its volcanic plumes and lava flows produce large surface changes and paint the surface in various subtle shades of yellow, red, white, black, and green, largely due to allotropes and compounds of sulfur. Numerous extensive lava flows, several more than 500 km (300 mi) in length, also mark the surface. The materials produced by this volcanism make up Io’s thin, patchy atmosphere and Jupiter’s extensive magnetosphere. Io’s volcanic ejecta also produce a large plasma torus around Jupiter.
Io played a significant role in the development of astronomy in the 17th and 18th centuries. It was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei, along with the other Galilean satellites. This discovery furthered the adoption of the Copernican model of the Solar System, the development of Kepler’s laws of motion, and the first measurement of the speed of light. From Earth, Io remained just a point of light until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when it became possible to resolve its large-scale surface features, such as the dark red polar and bright equatorial regions. In 1979, the two Voyager spacecraft revealed Io to be a geologically active world, with numerous volcanic features, large mountains, and a young surface with no obvious impact craters. The Galileo spacecraft performed several close flybys in the 1990s and early 2000s, obtaining data about Io’s interior structure and surface composition. These spacecraft also revealed the relationship between Io and Jupiter’s magnetosphere and the existence of a belt of radiation centered on Io’s orbit. Io receives about 3,600 rem (36 Sv) of radiation per day.[10]
Further observations have been made by Cassini–Huygens in 2000 and New Horizons in 2007, as well as from Earth-based telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope as technology has advanced.

Galileo spacecraft true-color image of Io. The dark spot just left of the center is the erupting volcanoPrometheus. The whitish plains on either side of it are coated with volcanically deposited sulfur dioxide frost, whereas the yellower regions contain a higher proportion of sulfur.

Io /ˈ./[6] is the innermost of the four Galilean moons of the planet Jupiter and, with a diameter of 3,642 kilometres (2,263 mi), the fourth-largest moon in the Solar System. It was named after the mythological character Io, a priestess of Herawho became one of Zeus's lovers.

With over 400 active volcanoes, Io is the most geologically active object in the Solar System.[7][8] This extreme geologic activity is the result of tidal heating from friction generated within Io’s interior as it is pulled between Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites—EuropaGanymede and Callisto. Several volcanoes produce plumes of sulfur and sulfur dioxide that climb as high as 500 km (300 mi) above the surface. Io’s surface is also dotted with more than 100 mountains that have been uplifted by extensive compression at the base of Io’s silicate crust. Some of these peaks are taller than Mount Everest.[9] Unlike most satellites in the outer Solar System, which are mostly composed of water ice, Io is primarily composed of silicate rock surrounding a molten iron or iron sulfide core. Most of Io’s surface is composed of extensive plains coated with sulfur and sulfur dioxide frost.

Io’s volcanism is responsible for many of its unique features. Its volcanic plumes and lava flows produce large surface changes and paint the surface in various subtle shades of yellow, red, white, black, and green, largely due to allotropes and compounds of sulfur. Numerous extensive lava flows, several more than 500 km (300 mi) in length, also mark the surface. The materials produced by this volcanism make up Io’s thin, patchy atmosphere and Jupiter’s extensive magnetosphere. Io’s volcanic ejecta also produce a large plasma torus around Jupiter.

Io played a significant role in the development of astronomy in the 17th and 18th centuries. It was discovered in 1610 by Galileo Galilei, along with the other Galilean satellites. This discovery furthered the adoption of the Copernican model of the Solar System, the development of Kepler’s laws of motion, and the first measurement of the speed of light. From Earth, Io remained just a point of light until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when it became possible to resolve its large-scale surface features, such as the dark red polar and bright equatorial regions. In 1979, the two Voyager spacecraft revealed Io to be a geologically active world, with numerous volcanic features, large mountains, and a young surface with no obvious impact craters. The Galileo spacecraft performed several close flybys in the 1990s and early 2000s, obtaining data about Io’s interior structure and surface composition. These spacecraft also revealed the relationship between Io and Jupiter’s magnetosphere and the existence of a belt of radiation centered on Io’s orbit. Io receives about 3,600 rem (36 Sv) of radiation per day.[10]

Further observations have been made by Cassini–Huygens in 2000 and New Horizons in 2007, as well as from Earth-based telescopes and the Hubble Space Telescope as technology has advanced.

(Source: gravitationalbeauty, via n-a-s-a)

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“I’m beginning to think this Neil deGrasse Tyson fellow is a serial fabricator of quotes.” — President Thomas Jefferson, “Stuff Jefferson Said: The Prequel,” Originally self-published at Amazon.com in 1573


Neil deGrasse Tyson may be a fabulous scientist, and a consummate showman, but he’s downright terrible at accurately quoting people. Or, if you’re a “glass half full” kind of person, you might say that Neil deGrasse Tyson is pretty amazing at needlessly fabricating quotes and scenarios to showcase his own brilliance.


We’ve already established that a newspaper headline touted for years by Tyson likely doesn’t exist. We’ve also established that the exact quote he uses to bash members of Congress as being stupid also doesn’t exist. And then we established that the details within one of Tyson’s favorite anecdotes — a story of how he bravely confronted a judge about his mathematical illiteracy while serving on jury duty — seem to change every time Tyson tells the story.
Read the rest of the story here. 

“I’m beginning to think this Neil deGrasse Tyson fellow is a serial fabricator of quotes.” — President Thomas Jefferson, “Stuff Jefferson Said: The Prequel,” Originally self-published at Amazon.com in 1573

Neil deGrasse Tyson may be a fabulous scientist, and a consummate showman, but he’s downright terrible at accurately quoting people. Or, if you’re a “glass half full” kind of person, you might say that Neil deGrasse Tyson is pretty amazing at needlessly fabricating quotes and scenarios to showcase his own brilliance.

We’ve already established that a newspaper headline touted for years by Tyson likely doesn’t exist. We’ve also established that the exact quote he uses to bash members of Congress as being stupid also doesn’t exist. And then we established that the details within one of Tyson’s favorite anecdotes — a story of how he bravely confronted a judge about his mathematical illiteracy while serving on jury duty — seem to change every time Tyson tells the story.

Read the rest of the story here

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Tags: hells angels
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baggytrousers27:

thewhitejewel:

baggytrousers27:

physicalalex:

everydaygun:

no-mercy-in-this-dojo:

revengeofthemudbutt:

whiskey-weather:

No.

No.

because physics

respect but no fucking way

i think i broke my collarbone watching this

Definition of parkour is getting from one place to another in the fastest possible route.

Without breaking your legs/spine/skull.

Having your internals still in one piece by the end of it is an optional bonus.

Mother of God.

baggytrousers27:

thewhitejewel:

baggytrousers27:

physicalalex:

everydaygun:

no-mercy-in-this-dojo:

revengeofthemudbutt:

whiskey-weather:

No.

No.

because physics

respect but no fucking way

i think i broke my collarbone watching this

Definition of parkour is getting from one place to another in the fastest possible route.

Without breaking your legs/spine/skull.

Having your internals still in one piece by the end of it is an optional bonus.

Mother of God.

(Source: jaidefinichon, via sting-sempai)

Tags: gif omg jumping
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Damn human.

Damn human.

(Source: only----gifs, via sujetosinpredicado)

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dannybrosco:

I’m right there with you

Yup, we suck. 

dannybrosco:

I’m right there with you

Yup, we suck. 

(via commitmenttoexcellence)

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Link
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Tags: 1911 45 acp gif